The Daily Show

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The Daily Show with Trevor Noah
Dailyshow logo.jpg
Premiere July 22, 1996
Finale
Airs Monday-Thursday at 11PM
Creator Madeleine Smithberg
Lizz Winstead
Host Craig Kilborn (1996–1998)
Jon Stewart (1999–2015)
Trevor Noah (2015–)
Network Comedy Central
Style 30-minute comedy news talk show
Company Mad Cow Productions
(seasons 1-7)
Seasons 21
Episodes 3717 (through season 21)
Status Currently airing season 22
Origin USA

The Daily Show is a 30-minute news program which focuses on satirizing and poking fun at current events. It airs on Comedy Central Monday through Thursday at 11:00PM EST with several repeats throughout the day. An "international" version also broadcasts weekly on CNN in Europe. The show also runs on the channel More4, based in the United Kingdom on Monday-Friday at 8:30PM GMT.

Contents

History

At its inception in 1996, the show was hosted by former ESPN SportsCenter anchor Craig Kilborn, who developed the news program as more of an entertainment gossip show. Kilborn often joked that he was playing the "enlightened frat boy" character. Despite this difference in tone, Kilborn pioneered many of the endearing qualities of the series including the basic format of headlines, fake "live" segments and the Moment of Zen. Kilborn also notably ended all of his interviews with Five Questions, which was pulled from a pick-up line he devised and later became the source behind the first Daily Show book. In 1998, Kilborn left the series to host The Late Late Show with Craig Kilborn and placed several of these concepts (including "Moment for Us") on embargo for use on his new show. After a four month hiatus, Kilborn was replaced by comedian and talk show host Jon Stewart.

Stewart took the series in a far more political direction. While Kilborn was the face of the previous three years, he did not write any of the material and, according to contributor Beth Littleford, was as "dumb as a post." Stewart, on the other hand, signed on as a co-executive producer and writer, as well as host. He focused the news content into sharper political satire rather than less sophisticated jokes that didn't probe the issue at hand. This new focus combined with in-depth Indecision 2000 election coverage caused the series to explode in popularity and critical acclaim.

The format for the series is generally static and has remained in the same for its entire tenure. The first block of the show is made up of what was once known as "Headlines," a brief run-down of some of the events of the day, often with commentary from a correspondent in a "live" setting (in actuality, they're a few feet from the desk in front of a green screen). The second block is typically taken up by a produced segment or a recurring bit like Back in Black or This Week in God. The third block is occupied by an interview with the night's guest.

This format isn't set in stone, however. The interview segment is occasionally extended into the second block, usually this happens when the interview has far more potential than any of the produced segments on hand or when the guest has a high degree of notoriety, like former presidents (Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter have both appeared), dignitaries (Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf) and controversial figures (Bernard Goldberg). The final minutes of the show are taken up lately by an occasional conversation between Stewart and Stephen Colbert, host of The Colbert Report (a Daily Show spin-off), through a fiberoptic link between their shows and, ultimately, the Moment of Zen.

The series spun off The Colbert Report, which was derived from a fake commercial in which Stephen Colbert played the role of a loud-mouthed pundit in the style of Bill O'Reilly. It began broadcasting in 2004.

In 2013, Stewart took a twelve-week leave to direct a film. During this time, long-time correspondent John Oliver took over as guest host. Oliver's stint was well received, and led to HBO offering him his own show. The last episode of 2013 was Oliver's last episode, with him starting Last Week Tonight with John Oliver in April 2014.

In 2015, Stewart announced he would be leaving the show, and his replacement was revealed to be Trevor Noah, who had become a contributor in December 2014. Stewart's final episode aired on August 6, 2015 and Noah's first episode as host will be on September 28, 2015.

Years

Year/Season Premiere Finale Episodes
Comedy Central
Season One July 22, 1996 December 19, 1996 65
Season Two January 6, 1997 December 18, 1997 160
Season Three January 5, 1998 December 17, 1998 161
Season Four January 11, 1999 December 21, 1999 159
Season Five January 5, 2000 December 21, 2000 160
Season Six January 9, 2001 December 20, 2001 161
Season Seven January 8, 2002 December 19, 2002 160
Season Eight January 7, 2003 December 18, 2003 159
Season Nine January 6, 2004 December 16, 2004 162
Season Ten January 4, 2005 December 15, 2005 159
Season Eleven January 4, 2006 December 20, 2005 161
Season Twelve January 8, 2007 November 1, 2007 133
Season Thirteen January 7, 2008 December 11, 2008 159 + special
Season Fourteen January 5, 2009 December 16, 2009 161
Season Fifteen January 4, 2010 December 16, 2010 161 + special
Season Sixteen January 3, 2011 December 15, 2011 160
Season Seventeen January 3, 2012 December 13, 2012 159
Season Eighteen January 7, 2013 December 19, 2013 160
Season Nineteen January 6, 2014 December 18, 2014 156
Season Twenty January 5, 2015 August 6, 2015 101 + special
Season Twenty-One September 28, 2015 September 29, 2016 164
Season Twenty-Two October 3, 2016

Cast

Person Duration
Hosts
Craig Kilborn 1 2 3
Jon Stewart 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Trevor Noah 20
Current Correspondents
Aasif Mandvi 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Al Madrigal 16 17 18 19 20
Jessica Williams 17 18 19 20
Jordan Klepper 19 20
Hasan Minhaj 19 20
Current Contributors
Lewis Black 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
John Hodgman 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Kristen Schaal 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Past Correspondents
Michael Showalter 1
David Wain 1
Lizz Winstead 1 2
A. Whitney Brown 1 2 3
Brian Unger 1 2 3
Beth Littleford 1 2 3 4 5
Stephen Colbert 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
Laura Kightlinger 3
Mo Rocca 3 4 5 6 7 8
Denny Siegel 4
Vance Degeneres 4 5 6
Nancy Walls 4 5 6 7
Stacey Grenrock-Woods 4 5 6 7 8
Steve Carell 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Jerry Minor 5
Miriam Tolan 5 6
Matt Walsh 5 6 7
Eric Drysdale 6
David Pompeii 6
Lauren Weedman 6 7
Mary Birdsong 7
Adrianne Frost 7
Rachael Harris 7 8
Rob Corddry 7 8 9 10 11 12
Ed Helms 7 8 9 10 11 13
Samantha Bee 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Jason Jones 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Jon Glaser 10
Nathan Corddry 10 11
Dan Bakkedahl 10 11 12
Rob Riggle 11 12 13
John Oliver 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Wyatt Cenac 13 14 15 16 17
Josh Gad 14 15 16
Olivia Munn 15 16
Michael Che 19
Past Contributors
John Bloom 1 2 3
Rich Brown 1 2 3
Frank DeCaro 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Paul F. Tompkins 3
Dave Attell 4 5 6 7
Andy Kindler 5
Bob Wiltfong 9 10
Demetri Martin 10 11 12 13 14
Larry Wilmore 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Buck Henry 12 13
Trevor Noah 20

In-Depth

DVD Releases

Title Release Date #
Episode Collections
The Daily Show with Jon Stewart: Indecision 2004 June 28, 2005 3


External Sites